1. Mark Hannan

    The Centrality of African Centered Theological Education

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    I received much more than what I bargained for. As an emerging scholar, CAATS cultivated my scholarly interests, which are rooted in the Black Church and the African American religious experience... I learned that Africentricity is an orientation, a location, position, and perspective that empowers African people to become the subjects of an evolving historical narrative, and not merely disembodied objects on the fringes of historical consideration.
  2. Mark Hannan

    An Open Letter from Detroit Religious Leaders and Allies

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    To Detroiters we say, alert, defend and protect your neighbors from shut-off. To Faith communities we say, become stations of water distribution (for information and guidance on this call 1-844-42WATER), as well as places of education, community and resistance. To Water workers, we say refuse to cut off your fellow citizens. To the Water Board, we say reverse this inhuman policy: turn their water back on. To the City Council, we say stop compounding this travesty with rate increases and other complicity. Revive and implement the Water Affordability Program. To the Governor we say: cease privatization and call off this action taken under emergency management.
  3. Mark Hannan

    Manifesto for People of Faith

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    “Without giving priority to the word “Together” there cannot be any serious attempt to build a just economy. SCUPE sought to demonstrate the primacy of “Together” this by partnering with Interfaith Worker Justice, and by bringing together key church and community leaders to conversation with each other. We think of this Congress as a first catalyzing event. Its manifesto for people of faith provides a robust platform for building such a movement.
  4. Mark Hannan

    Allan Boesak at the 2014 Congress on Urban Ministry

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    The 2014 Congress on Urban Ministry is in session! SCUPE is knee deep in the action packed third day of our national conference but we wanted to share a bit of the exciting happenings of the gathering. The following is an excerpt of Rev. Dr. Allan A. Boesak's plenary sermon from Monday night - representing the worshipful culmination of our joint conference time with Interfaith Worker Justice. This partnership and the exciting new ground our two organizations have been exploring link together workers' struggles for economic justice with the Gospel march towards the Kingdom of God.
  5. Mark Hannan

    Workshops at the 2014 Congress

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    The 2011 Congress will be home to an incredible offering of workshops on a wide-range of topics of concern to people of faith, urban congregations, social justice activists, theologians, and individuals committed to building a Just Economy. The 45 workshops offered over the 3-and-a-half day conference are organized across four different workshop-sessions and thematically amongst the following eight tracks... You will find a full listing of workshops here in PDF format.
  6. Mark Hannan

    Rain and the Rhinoceros: Privatization of the Common Good

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    Bill Wylie-Kellermann - SCUPE professor, pastor, Detroit community activist, and 1/2 of the teaching team for the 2014 Congress on Urban Ministry's graduate level theology course "Good News for the City: Together Building a Just Economy" - shares his poignant reflection on privatization, Emergency Management in Detroit, and the necessity of faith-filled response.
  7. Mark Hannan

    Our Speakers

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    Check out the great group of speakers we have gathered for our 17th Congress on Urban Ministry which takes place June 23-26 in Chicago, IL. These leading voices stand at the intersection of faith and social justice and will guide us through prayer, worship, learning, and discernment for action, so that we can Together Build a Just Economy.
  8. Mark Hannan

    Together… Building a Just Economy

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    TOGETHER…. In the theme of the Congress on Urban Ministry means exactly what it sounds like. A Just Economy can’t be built alone. It must be done TOGETHER. That means YOU ARE NEEDED at the table. Your church, community, institution must be represented. Your voice, your passion, your energy and your commitment are critical to the conversations we hold and commitments we make.